Banning Ranch

Banning Ranch

Banning Ranch

Banning Ranch

Banning Ranch

Banning Ranch is a stretch of coastal wetlands and bluffs between Newport Beach, Huntington Beach, and Costa Mesa, encompassing roughly 400 acres of undeveloped land. The land is currently an active oil field, but conservationists are working tirelessly to purchase Banning Ranch and convert it into a public park. Protecting Banning Ranch would connect nearly 15 million Southern Californians to a beautiful, much-needed coastal park space.

Protection Status

Thanks to 20+ years of local advocacy by groups like the Banning Ranch Conservancy and transaction expertise from The Trust for Public Land, the task of raising the $97 million needed to acquire Banning Ranch from its current owner is nearly complete. The funds raised so far include private, state, and federal contributions. Recently, the Costa Mesa City Council supported a resolution to support the acquisition.

Protection Status

Thanks to 20+ years of local advocacy by groups like the Banning Ranch Conservancy and transaction expertise from The Trust for Public Land, the task of raising the $97 million needed to acquire Banning Ranch from its current owner is nearly complete. The funds raised so far include private, state, and federal contributions. Recently, the Costa Mesa City Council supported a resolution to support the acquisition.

Local experts

Learn more about Banning Ranch from our partners on the ground.

Melanie Schlotterbeck, Executive Director of The Banning Ranch Conservancy

BIODIVERSITY

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Lying close to the Pacific Ocean, Banning Ranch features lush coastal sage scrub, wetlands, and vernal pools (seasonal wetland pools), and is home to many animals such as red-tailed hawks, coyotes, blue heron, and San Diego fairy shrimp.

CLIMATE RESILIENCE

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Banning Ranch is unique in that it would convert most of an active oil field into protected land that includes wetlands, which are key carbon sinks and buffers for sea level rise.

ACCESS

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One-third of residents surrounding Banning Ranch currently live in communities which lack access to open space. Allowing appropriate public access on Banning Ranch would have a huge impact on the local community’s proximity to outdoor recreation which improves mental and physical health.


Tribal Acknowledgement

Banning Ranch is a part of the traditional land of the Tongva and Acjachemen Native American Nations. The land was known as the Village of Genga, a ritual and trading hub that existed for thousands of years before the region was colonized by Europeans.


Guillermo Rodriguez

Reducing oil operations and putting Banning Ranch in public hands is a legacy issue for California, one that will provide park equity and coastal access to millions in the region.”

Guillermo Rodriguez

California State Director at the Trust for Public Land

Resources

NEWS

Costa Mesa council supports $97M acquisition, preservation of Banning Ranch

CAL MATTERS
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Volunteer with Banning Ranch Conservancy

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Melanie Schlotterbeck

It’s important for the community to know that the Banning Ranch Conservancy is committed to a robust engagement process that incorporates habitat protection and public access, but most importantly ensures that the voices of those that may not often rise to the top get heard—those could be nearby communities as well as the Native Nations. Remember, these lands were theirs first.”

Melanie Schlotterbeck

Executive Director at the Banning Ranch Conservancy

DID YOU KNOW?

Banning Ranch is the largest undeveloped private property on the Southern California coast.

Banning Ranch
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